Lovastatin for Reduction of Leptin in Nondialysis Patients With Type 2 Diabetic Nephropathy

Authors

  • Sharareh Gholamin Institute for Stem Cell Biology and Regenerative Medicine, Department of Neurosurgery, Stanford University, Stanford, CA, USA and Clinical Research and Development Center, Shahid Modarres Hospital, Shahid Beheshti University of Medical Sciences, Iran
  • Seyed-Mostafa Razavi Clinical Research and Development Center, Shahid Modarres Hospital, Shahid Beheshti University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran
  • Seyed-Meghdad Taghavi-Garmestani Clinical Research and Development Center, Shahid Modarres Hospital, Shahid Beheshti University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran
  • Amir Ghorbanihaghjo Biotechnology Research Center, Tabriz University of Medical Sciences, Tabriz, Iran
  • Nadereh Rashtchizadeh Biotechnology Research Center, Tabriz University of Medical Sciences, Tabriz, Iran
  • Javid Safa Drug Applied Research Center, Tabriz University of Medical Sciences, Tabriz, Iran
  • Amir Mansour Vatankhah Drug Applied Research Center, Tabriz University of Medical Sciences, Tabriz, Iran
  • Tabassom Azizi Urology and Nephrology Research Center, Shahid Beheshti University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran
  • Hassan Argani Urology and Nephrology Research Center, Shahid Beheshti University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran

Abstract

Introduction. Diabetic Nephropathy (DN) is one of the main complications of diabetes mellitus, mostly ending to end-stage renal disease. Leptin and C-reactive protein (CRP), as inflammatory markers implicated in the progression of DN, increase in diabetes mellitus, while transferrin and albumin, as members of anti-oxidant defense mechanism, are found to decline.

Materials and Methods. In a controlled clinical trial, 65 patients with type 2 DN were assigned to receive lovastatin or placebo, for 3 months, to assess statins' impact on serum levels of leptin, CRP, transferrin, albumin, and lipid profile.

Results. Serum levels of CRP (3.52 ± 4.16 mg/dL to 2.84 ± 3.06 mg/dL, P = .02), leptin (10.78 ± 8.30 mg/dL to 7.80 ± 5.41 mg/dL, P = .006), low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (116.16 ± 46.54 mg/dL to 85.46 ± 29.22 mg/dL, P < .001), and total cholesterol (199.00 ± 43.33 mg/dL to 164.67 ± 35.19 mg/dL, P < .001) were lowered after lovastatin therapy. Mean serum level of high-density lipoprotein cholesterol increased (40.00 mg/dL to 42.80 mg/dL, P = .005) after the treatment. Lovastatin had no significant effect on albumin and transferrin. Placebo did not change any of the parameters after 3 months.

Conclusions. The effect of statins on the inflammatory markers involved in the development of DN is a new approach to evidence supporting the pleiotropic effect of this drug group.

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Published

2014-05-28

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Section

ORIGINAL | Kidney Diseases