Kidney Disease Profile of Syrian Refugee Children

Authors

  • Mehtap Akbalik Kara Department of Pediatric Nephrology, School of Medicine, Gaziantep University, Gaziantep, Turkey
  • Beltinge Demircioglu Kilic Department of Pediatric Nephrology, School of Medicine, Gaziantep University, Gaziantep, Turkey
  • Nilgun Col Department of Social Pediatrics, School of Medicine, Gaziantep University, Gaziantep, Turkey
  • Ayse Aysima Ozcelik Department of Pediatric Neurology, School of Medicine, Gaziantep University, Gaziantep, Turkey
  • Mithat Buyukcelik Department of Pediatric Nephrology, School of Medicine, Gaziantep University, Gaziantep, Turkey
  • Ayse Balat Department of Pediatric Nephrology, School of Medicine, Gaziantep University, Gaziantep, Turkey

Abstract

Introduction. Although preventative nephrology is the effective management of childhood kidney diseases, it is hard to provide it in this undesirable conditions. In this study, we aimed to document the kidney disease profile of Syrian refugee children admitted to our hospital.

Materials and Methods. One hundred and thirty Syrian refugee children were admitted to the Pediatric Nephrology Department of the University of Gaziantep from September 2012 to January 2015. Demographic data, history, symptoms, physical examination findings, laboratory investigations, diagnosis, disease outcome, and therapeutic procedures such as peritoneal dialysis and hemodialysis were obtained from patient files.

Results. Of the 130 admitted children, 74 were girls (59.6%). The average age was 6.97 ± 4.2 years (range, 1 month to 17 years). Congenital abnormalities of the kidney and urinary tract were found in 34 children (26.2%). Other morbidities were chronic kidney disease in 30 (23.1%), nephrotic syndrome in 24 (18.5%), urolithiasis in 9 (6.9%), acute kidney injury in 4 (3.1%), glomerulonephritis in 5 (3.8%), enuresis in 12 (9.2%), and others in 12 (9.2%).

Conclusions. Congenital abnormalities of the kidney and urinary tract and chronic kidney disease were highly prevalent in Syrian refugee children. Although free health care have been provided to all of these children, the continuation of political crisis and instability would increase the number of admissions and affect the quality of life of those children in a different environment from the home country.

Author Biographies

  • Mehtap Akbalik Kara, Department of Pediatric Nephrology, School of Medicine, Gaziantep University, Gaziantep, Turkey

    Gaziantep University Faculty of Medicine

    Pediatric nephrology department

  • Beltinge Demircioglu Kilic, Department of Pediatric Nephrology, School of Medicine, Gaziantep University, Gaziantep, Turkey

    Gaziantep University Faculty of Medicine

    Pediatric nephrology department

  • Nilgun Col, Department of Social Pediatrics, School of Medicine, Gaziantep University, Gaziantep, Turkey

    Gaziantep University Faculty of Medicine

    Social pediatrics department

  • Ayse Aysima Ozcelik, Department of Pediatric Neurology, School of Medicine, Gaziantep University, Gaziantep, Turkey

    Gaziantep University Faculty of Medicine

    Pediatric neurology department

  • Mithat Buyukcelik, Department of Pediatric Nephrology, School of Medicine, Gaziantep University, Gaziantep, Turkey

    Gaziantep University Faculty of Medicine

    Pediatric nephrology department

  • Ayse Balat, Department of Pediatric Nephrology, School of Medicine, Gaziantep University, Gaziantep, Turkey

    Gaziantep University Faculty of Medicine

    Pediatric nephrology department

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Published

2017-02-07

Issue

Section

SPECIAL REPORT | Kidney Diseases