Serum Triiodothyronine Level as an Indicator of Inflammation in Patients Undergoing Dialysis

Authors

  • Abbas Ali Zeraati Division of Nephrology, Department of Internal Medicine, Imam Reza Hospital, Mashhad University of Medical Sciences, Mashhad, Iran
  • Parvin Layegh Division of Endocrinology, Department of Internal Medicine, Imam Reza Hospital, Mashhad University of Medical Sciences, Mashhad, Iran
  • Yalda Famili
  • Massih Naghibi Division of Nephrology, Department of Internal Medicine, Imam Reza Hospital, Mashhad University of Medical Sciences, Mashhad, Iran
  • Farzaneh Sharifipour Division of Nephrology, Department of Internal Medicine, Imam Reza Hospital, Mashhad University of Medical Sciences, Mashhad, Iran
  • Zhaleh Shariati Sarabi Division of Rheumatology, Department of Internal Medicine, Imam Reza Hospital, Mashhad University of Medical Sciences, Mashhad, Iran

Abstract

Introduction. It has been shown that inflammation affects thyroid function. In patients with end-stage renal disease, low plasma triiodothyronine (T3) may be an unsuspected expression of the inflammatory state of these patients. This study evaluated the correlation between T3 and high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (HSCRP) levels in patients on peritoneal dialysis (PD) and hemodialysis.

Materials and Methods. This is a cross-sectional study aiming at the correlation between T3 and HSCRP levels among 30 patients on PD, 30 patients on hemodialysis, and 20 healthy individuals. Serum levels of HSCRP, T3, thyroxine (T4), thyroid stimulating hormone, T3 resin uptake, and free T3 index (FT3I) and free T4 index (FT4I) were compared between the three groups.

Results. There were no significant differences between hemodialysis and PD patients in respect to T3, T4, FT3I, and FT4I. In PD and hemodialysis patients, T3 and FT3I were lower than in controls (P < .001), but there was no significant difference between PD and hemodialysis patients. T3 resin uptake and thyroid stimulating hormone differed significantly between PD and hemodialysis patients. There was a significant inverse correlation between HSCRP and T3 and FT3I among hemodialysis patients (P = .04); however, there was no such correlations in PD patients.

Conclusions. The relationship between T3 and HSCRP suggests that inflammation might be involved in the low T3 syndrome in hemodialysis patients, but we did not find a significant correlation between T3 and HSCRP levels in patients on peritoneal dialysis.

Author Biographies

  • Abbas Ali Zeraati, Division of Nephrology, Department of Internal Medicine, Imam Reza Hospital, Mashhad University of Medical Sciences, Mashhad, Iran
    Assistant Professor of Nephrology,Department of Internal Medicine, Imam Reza Hospital, Division of Nephrology
  • Parvin Layegh, Division of Endocrinology, Department of Internal Medicine, Imam Reza Hospital, Mashhad University of Medical Sciences, Mashhad, Iran
    Assistant Professor of Endocrinology and Metabolism,Department of Internal Medicine, Imam Reza Hospital, Division of Endocrinology and Metabolism
  • Yalda Famili
    Internist,Bardaskan Hospital
  • Massih Naghibi, Division of Nephrology, Department of Internal Medicine, Imam Reza Hospital, Mashhad University of Medical Sciences, Mashhad, Iran
     Professor of Nephrology,Department of Internal Medicine, Imam Reza Hospital, Division of Nephrology
  • Farzaneh Sharifipour, Division of Nephrology, Department of Internal Medicine, Imam Reza Hospital, Mashhad University of Medical Sciences, Mashhad, Iran
    Assistant Professor of Nephrology,Department of Internal Medicine, Imam Reza Hospital, Division of Nephrology
  • Zhaleh Shariati Sarabi, Division of Rheumatology, Department of Internal Medicine, Imam Reza Hospital, Mashhad University of Medical Sciences, Mashhad, Iran
    Associate Professor of Rheumatology,Department of Internal Medicine, Imam Reza Hospital, Division of Rheumatology

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Published

2010-12-21

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Section

ORIGINAL | Dialysis